Monday, January 02, 2006

Journalist examines the 'Age of Blogging'

Can blogging and journalism coexist?

[From "Lord of the blogs"]

Of all the stories leading America's annual greatest hits list, the one that subsumes the rest is the continuing evolution of information in the Age of Blogging. Not since the birth of the printing press have our lives been so dramatically affected by the way we create and consume information - both to our enormous benefit and, perhaps, to our growing peril. What is wonderful and miraculous about the Internet needs little elaboration.

We all marvel at the ease with which we can access information - whether reading government documents previously available only to a few, or tracking down old friends and new enemies. It is this latter - our new enemies - that interests me most. I don't mean al-Qaida or Osama bin Laden, but the less visible, insidious enemies of decency, humanity and civility - the angry offspring of narcissism's quickie marriage to instant gratification.


The above is an excerpt from a commentary written by Kathleen Parker of the Orlando Sentinel. Parker goes on to write that while she means no disrespect to bloggers. At the same time, she makes this declaration:


Bloggers persist no matter their contributions or quality, though most would have little to occupy their time were the mainstream media to disappear tomorrow. Some bloggers do their own reporting, but most rely on mainstream reporters to do the heavy lifting. Some bloggers also offer superb commentary, but most babble, buzz and blurt like caffeinated adolescents competing for the Ritalin generation's inevitable senior superlative: Most Obsessive-Compulsive.


Parker's op-ed piece, no doubt, is generating discussion in the blogosphere. To read her entire article, click here.


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12 comments:

AsianSmiles said...

Strong words from her.I wonder how she was when she was just starting her career... and I do wonder if she wouldn't build a blog if she is not a professional writer now.

I also don't know where she got the idea that bloggers think that mainstream media will disappear tomorrow. If it is true, then I can understand where her predicament is coming from.

Thank you for the good info Sis.

Deb S. said...

AsianSmiles: As usual, you make some very good points.

I think the most creative language in the commentary is this: "... most [bloggers] babble, buzz and blurt like caffeinated adolescents competing for the Ritalin generation's inevitable senior superlative: Most Obsessive-Compulsive."

Hmmmm. It is possible that I resemble that remark. :-)

Alina said...

As always, very usefull information, DCS, especially for my paper! :) I was not around, so, a bit late :D, I want to thank you for your wishes and wish you the best new year ever!

Deb S. said...

Kayla: Oh, yeah, you are working on that paper! LOL
I'm glad the article is useful. Thank you for your good wishes. Good luck with the paper!

Malik said...

It's an immature medium, (heck, blogging is barely 5 or 6 years old) so expecting blogs to consistently reflect the sophistication and sobriety of established print media is unreasonable. Blogging is in it's adolescence, so of course it shows adolescent tendencies. That doesn't mean you should casually dismiss it. Eventually, blogging will grow up, and those who have made serious investments in the medium will find that they have an extremely powerful and influential tool in their hands.

Malik said...

Clarification: when I say "you should" I mean "one should"

Deb S. said...

Dr. Malik: Well said. Students are lined up, waiting to sign up for your class. :-)

Deb S. said...

BTW, Dr. Malik: I wonder if Kayla is going to jump to the front of the line and use your comments in her paper. :-)

Malik said...

Oh cut it out. :)

Deb S. said...

"Dr. Malik." It has a certain ring to it. LOL

Nth Dimension said...

" but most babble, buzz and blurt like caffeinated adolescents competing for the Ritalin generation's inevitable senior superlative: Most Obsessive-Compulsive."

Pretty insightful words, but I would have taken her on her face-value if she had the nerve to also point fingers at her ilk too, and point out the obvious...many Op-Ed contributors on the so-called mainstream media qualify hands-down..and almost all talking heads on the radio these days.

In the absence of such self-scrutiny, I have to simply conclude that her's is yet another example of "ballast off a sinking ship"...

Deb S. said...

Nth Dimension: Well, we know where you stand on this topic. You're certainly not alone. :-)